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Super Bowl LII Is A NSSE Lesson

 

Some people will watch Super Bowl LII to root for their team, others to catch a glimpse of puppies with Clydesdales, but I’ll watch to admire an exquisitely complicated and perfectly orchestrated NSSE (National Special Security Event)

A major public event that attracts a large attendance, includes dignitaries, or that has historic, political, or religious significance may be designated by the Department of Homeland Security as an NSSE. Many of America’s marquee events that could be attractive targets for terrorism or other disruptions fall into this category. Typically, such events are of a size and scope that is far beyond the scale of local resources. A NSSE determination is based on a SEAR (Special Event Assessment Rating). This system assesses threats and incorporates a risk analysis and then ranks the event on a 1-5 scale, with 1 being the highest priority. Super Bowl is definitely a SEAR 1 event.

Once designated an NSSE, federal and local agencies work together to construct a security plan that covers everything from traffic and crowd control to hotel security, tactical units, communications, volunteers, evacuation plans, access, and much more. Work is done in committees. The Minneapolis Super Bowl Host Committee and Minneapolis Police Department have been working for two years in conjunction with federal agencies to develop security plans including snipers on rooftops and the largest influx of federal agents in Super Bowl History. Most guests will never see the extra layers of personnel and resources assembled to keep them safe but security personnel and systems will be everywhere.

Campus event planners need to be aware of what constitutes an NSSE because we frequently host events that might qualify. Occasions such as presidential debates, visits by international leaders or religious officials such as the Pope, or high-profile sporting events like an NCAA championship game are all candidates. An NSSE’s heightened and complicated security arrangements are not business as usual meaning that we need to learn how to appropriately engage in security planning. Security on such a massive scale forces planners to give up some autonomy and requires that we cannot adjust plans at the last minute (as we often do) without first conferring with those in charge of security.

Recently, a group of lighting professionals were working at an NSSE. The crew had been instructed the night before by the event planner to dress in show black without logos, bring their backpacks, and set up underneath the bleachers inside of the secure perimeter. The problem was, she never told security officials of her last-minute directive. While the crew were waiting in the designated place, an officer spotted the unknown men and an alert went up the chain of command. Security quickly responded, detaining the men while an investigation took place. The situation was soon resolved but it was unnerving to reflect on the fact that the men had been in the sights of snipers. The moral of the story is, during an NSSE, event planners are no longer the final authority but part of a much larger team. We must be forthcoming with information, be aware of the potentially dangerous consequences of our decisions, and be fully engaged in planning and briefings.

If a major security event is on your horizon

  • Begin planning early by contacting local law enforcement;
  • Take part in committee meetings;
  • If you are not included, speak up and get involved;
  • Follow directions;
  • Never change plans without first consulting the security team;
  • Attend briefings as appropriate so you know what’s going on.

To learn more about NSSE designation requirements, go to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, http://www.dhs.gov