Posted on

Experience A Better Employee Awards Ceremony

Spring semester often includes employee recognition events honoring years of service which means people are given thank-you gifts of ad specialty products ranging from coffee mugs to key rings to cheap watches. This year, supplies may be disrupted because coronavirus has idled factories in China, the place where many logoed tchotchkes originate.  The cut-off of these goods gives us the opportunity to hit the reset button and find more environmentally friendly, creative, and useful ways to show loyal employees appreciation. While service award ceremonies often get short shrift from events planners because they fall into the category of routine annual events, these occasions may be the only recognition a person receives for his or her efforts. We need to make the day truly special. Here are some gift ideas that are far better than a plaque, certificate, another tee shirt, plastic water bottle, or portable cell phone charger, and that will actually be used and appreciated.

Shop on campus. Research shows that Millennials, the generation that will comprise the majority of your 1-5 year honorees, don’t want more stuff. Instead, they want to experience new things. Ditch the car coffee mugs and look no further than your own campus for goodies this group will enjoy. Collect a selection of things like tickets to campus theatre, music, and athletic events, concerts, vouchers for food courts and dining halls, coffee shops, and the bookstore. Let people pick from the selection to enjoy a gift that will give them a campus experience that interests them.   

Some people do want stuff, so supplement from inventory on hand. Not everyone wants an experience so do plan to provide options. Select items from your bookstore, or visit the events office gift closet. Often we have odds and ends of high-end gift items that were purchased for specific occasions. Currently our gift closet includes logoed cutting boards, pad folios, good quality pens, etched stemless wine glasses, umbrellas, and autographed books by faculty authors. There is insufficient quantity of any of these things to use at a future event, but because they are high-quality and aren’t labeled with a specific event name or date, they would make nice additions to the recognition gift table. As a bonus, you’re recycling instead of throwing items away or warehousing them indefinitely.

More service? Bigger prize. Beginning with 10 years of service, employees are often given more expensive items. Sadly these frequently include versions of outmoded prizes no one really wants like framed photos of campus buildings, key rings, logoed paperweights, cheap acrylic trophies, business card holders, and fancy pad folios.  All too often, these gifts become bookcase clutter or junk-drawer dandruff. (Not to mention that many categories of employees have no use for office sit-arounds because their work stations are not desks.)  Instead, reward employees who have more years of service with things like a certificate for professional development or a continuing education class, a fitness center membership, an upgrade to a stand-up desk, a uniform voucher, or a generous bookstore gift certificate. How about a personal day off (or two) that doesn’t need to be charged to vacation time?

Give long-time employees what they really want. At our school, employees with more than 25 years used to receive a logoed wooden rocking chair. While this was a pricey prize, it pleased some but offended many and the concept is definitely passé in 2020! Of course, the longest serving employees deserve the best gifts. How about giving something that everyone on campus covets–an annual parking pass or a reserved parking place for a year? Perhaps season tickets to his or her favorite sport or VIP passes to your school’s premier concert or special occasion.  Now those are gifts worth receiving!

Employee recognition is important. Research shows that employees who feel appreciated, recognized, and valued are more loyal, work harder, and have less turnover so it is important to personalize the occasion for each honoree. An effective way to give individuals a moment in the spotlight is to stage your ceremony like a commencement. Call each individual’s name as he or she walks onstage, shakes hands with the president, and has a photo taken. Distribute the photos digitally with a personalized note of appreciation. Serve refreshments while honorees browse the gift tables and make their selections. Your honorees will thank you and you’ll never go back to ball caps and cell phone grips again!

For more tips about planning a meaningful ceremony, click on the special events tab on my web site,  http://correctoncampus.com.

 

 

Posted on

Be Prepared for Events Emergencies

January has brought a vivid reminder that special events planners are often the first line of defense in emergencies.  Last week started with a woman having chest pains and ended with another having a seizure. This week, a guest’s parking lot fall required six stitches and a colleague’s office space heater caught on fire. The unexpected is always lurking just around the corner. In December, our region was raked by tornadoes. (Who would ever anticipate tornadoes in December?) As events planners, it is imperative that we know what to do when the unforeseen happens.

Now is the perfect time to renew staff training in first aid and other emergency procedures. And don’t forget to include student workers, members of your ambassador corps, and volunteers.

Get certified in first aid, CPR, and AED (automated external defibrillator) use. Many schools offer American Red Cross training through their risk management programs. Certification is good for two years. We attend as a group because it helps reinforce instruction. Over the years I’ve experienced emergencies small and large ranging from a man who smashed his finger in a car door to finding an event participant unconscious in a parking lot on an August afternoon, a victim of heat stroke.

Know severe weather procedures. Event staff should know where shelters are in each venue. Plan how you will direct participants to them. Once, while we were under a tornado warning, our audience of foreign visitors who had no understanding of the risk, wanted to go outside to watch since they had never seen a tornado. Fortunately, a well-trained special events staffer had a script that could be read from the podium that explained the danger. Her clear instructions about what to do kept the curious visitors inside and safe.

A recent severe weather drill exposed a serious flaw in a new building’s emergency plan: While the plan looked good on paper, the spaces that were designated as shelters are too small and some are behind locked doors. Without an emergency practice, we would not have discovered this until too late. A new plan has since been drafted.

Hold fire drills. Practice with your campus safety office to ensure everyone knows how to evacuate and what to do once that happens. Where do people meet? How do you account for everyone? Evidence shows that in an emergency people will try to exit through the door they entered. Unfortunately, this may not be safe or accessible. Be certain staff know alternative ways out.

Review Your Set-ups. Consult with emergency management personnel such as your campus safety office or risk manager to review venue set ups with an eye toward ensuring the arrangement of chairs, stages, catering, displays, and gear is not an impediment to people being able to evacuate.

Know the physical address of each venue. College campuses can be confusing places in terms of way finding. It is imperative that event staff know how to assist emergency responders in locating the building. Often, GPS directs to a generic address for the entire campus. This will delay response. We issue lanyards with the address of the buildings we are using so event staff need only read this information from the back of the card. If the campus map posted on your web site uses building numbers, it also helpful to provide this information when calling 911.

Meet with campus safety to discuss emergency procedures. Always keep them posted on large events and identify concerns in advance. This is especially important when hosting visiting dignitaries, elected officials, celebrities, or a speaker or group that might attract controversy. Make a plan for various scenarios and keep it up-to-date. Be certain all staff are aware of what has been decided.

Don’t forgot the big ones. Be certain that you have emergency plans for major gatherings such as athletics contests and commencement. Large audiences and in some cases, non-campus venues, demand emergency planning on a much bigger scale, a drill that is often overlooked because it involves coordination with multiple law enforcement agencies, emergency responders, facilities personnel, and events planners.

Empower Staff to Respond. No one should ever wonder if it’s ok to call 9-1-1. Let your staff and volunteers know that they don’t need to check with someone else before calling for help. Better to call and not need it, than waste critical minutes in an emergency. For large events, we hold a mandatory emergency briefing with staff and volunteers right before doors open. We point out all exits, be certain everyone knows the facility’s address, and discuss possible disruptions such as impending bad weather. Most importantly, we tell people that if they think a situation is an emergency, it is and we empower them to take the appropriate steps to get help.

 

 

 

Posted on

A Very Special Event Well Shared

Every special events planner dreams about someday creating a signature annual event, one that has long-lasting and meaningful impact. Often, it’s a fund-raising event for an important cause. Women in our town have created signature events in support of the symphony, to fight breast cancer, and to build neonatal care facilities at a local hospital. In most cases, you don’t know you are creating a signature event until it becomes one.

My signature event is the outgrowth of a routine assignment from my boss—figure out a way to demonstrate the university’s commitment to future workforce development with an emphasis on encouraging girls’ interest in STEM. The result was Girls Science and Engineering Day, a day-long annual program that brings 500 third through fifth grade girls to campus to take part in workshops presented by women engineers, scientists, mathematicians, computer experts, biologists, and rocket scientists. A hard sell the first year, Girls Science and Engineering Day  (http://gseduah.com) has grown in quality and passion, attracting a faithful cadre of volunteers, excited girls, corporate sponsors, and even the U.S. Army Golden Knights Parachute Team. My job is to be the catalyst that creates the structure then ignites the efforts of more than 300 enthusiastic volunteers who implement the program, infuse it with energy, and ensure its success. With 10 years under our belts, Girls Science and Engineering Day has won a wall full of awards and is widely copied by other schools. We happily share our formula.

This week I had the honor to join women from Bolivia, Burma, Cameroon, Indonesia, Nepal, Nigeria, Peru, and Slovenia who are here on a U.S. Department of State International Visitor Leadership Program to gather ideas and share how-to information so that they can implement STEM support programs for females in their countries. All accomplished professors, engineers, astronomers, and even a medical doctor, it was fascinating to hear the obstacles they have encountered and the joys of their successes on their quests to attain their career goals. Like us, they all share the desire to help other girls and women achieve their dreams and they are willing to make time in their own busy lives to mentor and to provide programming to help lead the way.  Despite very different backgrounds, talking with these women felt like we were seeing old friends. We swapped ideas, compared notes and told the story of our experiences.  It is very satisfying to know that Girls Science and Engineering Day has now been shared internationally and that our program may germinate ideas that will help little girls in other countries awaken their full potentials. Now that’s future workforce development!

Posted on

Do You Work With A Volcano?

Do you work with a volcano? I’m talking about an irascible person whose irrational adult temper tantrums explode on all bystanders at the most inopportune moments causing fear, confusion, hurt feelings, and embarrassment just when the team most needs to pull together. The deadline pressure of special events in particular seem to provoke these people. Over time, this unpredictable, immature, and vicious behavior breeds distrust, anger, and contempt for the individual and causes good staff to head for the door in search of a better work environment, one where they are appreciated and trusted. The behavior is especially damaging when the volcano is an authority figure.  I am not a mental health professional, but here are my observations on how to deal with a volcanic colleague.

Experience tells me that volcano people explode when the stakes are high (e.g.—during load-in or moments before a major event is about to happen) and when they don’t feel in control or they don’t have all the information they think they need. This applies even if that information has nothing to do with their areas of responsibility. The outburst exposes their deficient self-confidence and lack of trust of others. The tantrum can also be triggered by lack of preparation on that person’s part—the bubbling up from deep down inside his or her own conscience that perhaps he or she didn’t complete tasks or didn’t do them well. The fear that they are about to be exposed causes a panic explosion thus diverting attention from the real problems.

Like a volcano, once the explosion begins, there is nothing that can be done to stop it so don’t be drawn in by arguing or contradicting, even though you may be right. This person isn’t listening and your efforts to reason with him or her will likely escalate the anger. Instead, maintain your professional composure, offer little or no responses and when you do, keep an even, calm (not sarcastic or condescending) tone in your voice.  If possible, try to maneuver her or him out of earshot of guests and other staff members. When the tirade abates, calmly give instructions to get people refocused on their jobs and get back on track. This will require an extraordinary amount of self-control but sucking you in and baiting you to lose your poise by provoking you to an angry response is just what this person wants. Don’t do it.

Later, when tempers have cooled, meet with the person to discuss what happened. Adult volcanoes are often bullies and I have found standing up to them with an unruffled demeanor when they are not irrational is one of the few methods that has any effect. Set boundaries by telling him or her (even if it is your boss) that you don’t appreciate being spoken to in that way and that you won’t tolerate such disrespectful behavior. Don’t be surprised if he or she denies the outburst or seems to remember it very differently from everyone else. Never mind rehashing the specifics of the incident or attempting to present facts. Volcanoes never accept responsibility for their actions and will not be receptive to your facts or defenses (even if you are right). If this person is one of your staff members, require him or her to apologize to those who were in the direct path of the eruption.

Bottom line: Work should not be a place where you have to constantly fear another outburst. Repeatedly having to endure such behavior, especially when the person is your boss, can affect not only your work life, but your personal relationships and overall happiness. Unfortunately, adult volcanoes rarely change their behavior and sometimes, the only certain relief is to seek another position.

There are many articles online about why adult temper tantrums happen and how to deal with them. One that I like is here: https://www.powerofpositivity.com/5-ways-deal-someone-temper-tantrum/.

 

Posted on

Plan To Reduce Special Event Waste

New years in academia comes in August and one of my resolutions is to make this year’s events as eco-friendly as possible. As the planning cycle starts, now is the time to work on this. Fall begins with a series of outdoor picnics and tailgating that are by their nature, messy and wasteful, generating a mountain of one-use plastic cups, plates, cutlery, table covers, and bottles. Why? Because it’s convenient. Planning not to make so much waste requires extra effort and involves negotiating with vendors and seeking out alternatives. Wasteful packaging has become our default to the point that we’ve forgotten the ways we used to do things before the world was filled with single-serving containers, polystyrene and Styrofoam “take out” boxes and bottled water. Being environmentally aware and doing our part as events planners to stop waste is no longer just “nice,” it is imperative. The collapse of the plastic bottle recycling market and the intense media coverage this year of the billions of pounds of plastic we are stacking up on land and tossing into our oceans highlight that the effort to control event waste is essential. Here are some ways to get started:

Understand your waste and plan how to avoid it. What will you be generating? One of our first fall events is a picnic for 1,600 students. I didn’t appreciate the impact of my choice to use plastic covers on 200 tables until last year when I saw the post-event giant ball of them headed for the landfill.  This year we are using paper covers held in place with reusable tablecloth clips!

Cutting down waste begins with planning not to create it in the first place. Plan menus that don’t require plastic cutlery and put condiments like ketchup and mustard in large pump dispensers instead of single serving plastic packets. If you do have to use cutlery, choose biodegradable bamboo. Avoid the ubiquitous plastic bagged napkin, knife, fork, spoon, salt and pepper. Often, only one of these items is used and the entire packet gets tossed in the trash. Cheap and readily available, I’ve seen caterers discard cases of these rather than load them for a return to their headquarters. You’ll no doubt get push-back from your food service provider or caterer, but strive for ways to offer unwrapped cutlery so people can choose only what they need.  Ban beverages in plastic bottles completely. Instead, offer drinks in aluminum cans or in paper cups filled from dispensers. Encourage people to bring their own bottles that can be filled at water stations but don’t make your own event-specific water bottles.  Everyone already has cupboards full of reusable bottles and making new ones is just generating more plastic! There is a strong market for aluminum recycling so canned beverages are an eco-friendly option. Water (and even wine) is now available in cans. Canned water comes in still, carbonated, and mineral options and with a little advanced planning, it’s possible to get it branded with your school logo.

Require vendors (including on campus food service) to honor your commitment to recyclables. Until everyone gets used to the idea, you’ll have to reinforce your commitment over and over again. Changes will need to be incorporated into the supply ordering process so start early.

Avoid the following because they cannot be recycled: Items that come in wrappers such as candy, condiments, and chips (serve chips in baskets with tongs); polystyrene/Styrofoam plates, cups, bowls, clam shell containers,  and “to go boxes;” plastic cutlery, bags, straws, stir sticks, and lids. Food-soiled boxes (like pizza boxes) and used plates.

Know what is accepted by your local recycler.  Find out what your campus recycling capabilities are and determine how to use them effectively. You may have to contract with an outside vendor.

Make it easy with good collection containers and clear signs. Put clean, nice-looking containers in high-traffic, high-visibility, convenient locations. Avoid dirty containers and those with lids because people don’t want to touch them. Clearly list the items that go in each container so people don’t have to try to figure it out.  Instead of saying “#1 plastic,” make it simple with “plastic bottles, aluminum cans, paper,” “food, used plates, and cutlery.” Since you’ve already selected products that can be recycled, there is no need to confuse people with too much information. Signs should be at eye-level. Always put a trash can beside a recycle bin to help people separate recyclables from trash in one stop.

Create a “Green Team.” Organize volunteers to tend recycling containers, answer questions, and empty as needed. This helps prevent people from dumping everything in the trash.

Make indoor functions green, too. Use china instead of disposable cups and plates, linen instead of throw-away table covers. Skip plastic straws and stir sticks. If you must offer straws, search “paper straws” online and you will find many vendors. You can even get the straws logoed. Don’t use plastic encased name badges or the now conference-standard name badges in giant plastic holders that dangle from lanyards. Most of these short-lived items wind up in the landfill and no one uses those “souvenir” lanyards after your event, meeting, or conference is done. (We’ve returned to logoed, paper stick-on badges with no complaints.) Don’t print programs, tickets, brochures, maps, agendas and the like. Instead, provide free Wi-Fi and either create a meeting app for this information, or post it on your web site. Skip purchasing ad specialty items that wind up in people’s junk drawers and eventually in the landfill. Forget ordering Polypropylene tote bags that are often given to attendees (with good intentions) to be reusable as grocery bags. A thermoplastic, about 5 billion pounds of Polypropylene are produced in the U.S. annually, yet less than 1 percent is recycled. The rest winds up in landfills where it takes 20-30 years to decompose.

Make your efforts known. Publicize the fact that you are striving to reduce waste and enlist people to help in the cause. Use the power of your higher-ed pulpit to teach students about environmental awareness and recycling by modeling these practices on campus. It’s an easy and important way to instill these habits in the next generation.

 

Posted on

Commencement is the Happiest of Days!

I love the peace of campus the Monday after commencement. Everything is quiet, no traffic, no parking challenges, no stressed-out students rushing from place-to-place. Faculty are gone and those of us involved in commencement can enjoy a long, quiet cup of coffee at our desk for the first time in weeks. Campus has the feeling of having been washed clean, much like the tranquility that follows a gentle spring rain.

Commencement is my favorite ceremony of the year. It’s a day when everyone is happy. Parents are proud, significant others celebrate, and graduates are ecstatic. It marks the end of years of work and holds the promise of adventures to come. It tells the world that you are different from the person you were yesterday.

That said, it is undeniable that commencement prep is stressful and can be frantic. Sometimes it’s downright aggravating. There are multiple ceremonies with a million moving parts, each one integral to the success of the whole. Each ceremony has its own cast of VIPs, seating arrangements, speeches, special awards, honorary degrees, and platform participants. Often there are but a few hours to re-set, re-do and be ready for the next “show.”  Our team manages just the dignitaries, a tiny slice of the thousands of people who participate and attend. In the days before, we dog trustees to confirm their plans, hunt for students who’ve forgotten to pick up their families’ VIP seating tickets, follow-up with people who have failed to rsvp, and cajole dignitaries who would rather skip preliminary events.

And commencement day is not a lone occasion, rather it is typically the culmination of other related activities all nested together in a cluster of celebratory events leading up to the big day. At our school, these include a formal dinner at the president’s home for the outstanding graduate from each college and the honorary degree recipients, a nursing pinning ceremony, the presentation of college awards and, of course, student parties. It requires physically moving tons of boxes of diplomas, platform party regalia, instruments and music stands, gonfalons and flags, and the university’s most precious relics, the mace and chain of office.

If I had any doubt whether it’s all worthwhile, that doubt was erased by one of my events office colleagues, a 50-year-old woman who received her master of business administration degree. Watching commencement work its magic on her even though she has helped facilitate for years and has been up to her ears in commencement prep for weeks, was gratifying. We observed with pride as she strode onto the stage, shook hands with the president and practically floated off the stairs. Afterward, she recounted how when the starter told her to go, she was frozen in place, then certain that the reader had said her name incorrectly, and finally, didn’t remember her two-foot-off the-floor dance down the stairs followed by hugging everyone she passed. She had what another colleague of mine calls “commencement face,” that gobsmacked, euphoric look that comes with realizing you’ve just accomplished something amazing. Commencement is the celebration of dreams, hopes, and visions. Like the work it took to get there, it’s definitely worth doing.

Congratulations to the class of 2019 and, in case you were too excited to hear the degree conferral formulary, welcome to the society of learned women and men.

 

Posted on

Books for Campus Events Planners

 

I’m proud to announce that updated editions of two of my most popular books, Special Events Planning for Success, 3rdedition, and Etiquette and Protocol A Guide for Campus Events, 2ndedition, are now available from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education. Both have been extensively updated to reflect our current societal norms including everything from managing burgeoning dietary preferences to extending electronic invitations to properly addressing same sex couples. These new editions join my book, Academic Ceremonies A Handbook of Traditions and Protocol to serve as quick references (and sometimes argument solvers) for the situations we face on campus every day. I hope you will add them to your bookshelf and refer to them often. Please order at http://case.org

Here is a list of titles that I consider indispensable reading for people who plan special events and ceremonies and who welcome VIP and international guests on campus. These books belong in every campus event planner’s office to serve as quick references when deadlines must be met. They are also excellent reading for newcomers for whom little formal onsite training may be available.

Academic Ceremonies A Handbook of Traditions and Protocol, by April L. Harris. A reference for commencement, convocation, the meaning of academic symbols and how to use them. Includes suggested ceremony line-ups.

Choosing Civility, The Twenty-five Rules of Considerate Conduct, by P.M. Forni. Food for thought about why what we do every day is important in making our world a more pleasant place.

Disability Etiquette Matters by Ellen L. Shackelford and Marguerite Edmonds. An excellent quick reference for interacting appropriately with people with disabilities.

Emily Post’s Etiquette, 18thedition, Manners for a New Worldby Peggy Post, Anna Post, Lizzie Post, and Daniel Post Sending. A contemporary resource for general etiquette questions.

Etiquette and Protocol A Guide for Campus Events, 2ndedition, by April L. Harris. A quick reference for answers on the questions campus events planners encounter everyday including academic forms of address, symbols of office, and faculty colors.

Event Leadership for a New World, 4thedition by Joe Goldblatt. An excellent textbook that teaches everything from strategic planning to managing contracts.

Honor and Respect, The Official Guide to Names, Titles, and Forms of Address by Robert Hickey. This is the definitive reference on proper use of names and titles around the world.

Our Flag, a U.S. government publication available either online or for purchase at bookstore.gpo.gov. This pamphlet is an excellent, accurate reference for U.S. flag protocol with an interesting section about the history of our flag.

Protocol The Authoritative Source, 35thAnniversary Edition, by Mary Jane McCaffree, Pauline Innis, and Richard M. Sands. More detailed than most of us need on the average day, but if you are hosting government and military officials, or need to ensure flags are appropriately displayed, this book is essential.

Robert’s Rules in Action: How to Participate in Meetings with Confidence, by Randi Minetor. A great quick reference for the situations encountered in all but the most formal meetings.

Robert’s Rules of Order Newly Revised, 11thedition, by Henry M. Robert III, Daniel H. Honemann, and Thomas J. Balch. This is the bible of parliamentary procedure for formal occasions like board of trustees’ meetings.

Special Events Planning for Success, 3rdedition, by April L. Harris. A how-to reference for creating effective events on campus including a discussion of why events are important for advancement.

Treating People Well, The Extraordinary Power of Civility at Work and in Life, by Lea Berman and Jeremy Bernard. A fun and inspiring read from two former White House social secretaries.

World Wise What to Know Before You Go, by Lanie Denslow. A primer for cross-cultural interactions, especially helpful for people who have never travelled overseas and useful to raise staff consciousness about cultural differences when welcoming delegations from other countries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted on

Build A Better Board

Board development is the most important duty of a non-profit executive director, even though those words may never be mentioned in his or her job description.  Having the right board members, and a continual supply of more of the same, makes the difference in whether an organization thrives or shrivels. Building an effective board is not a one and done job, instead, it is a constant exercise in strategy, cultivation, and engagement. A few weeks ago, I posted about building bylaws. Once your bylaws are in order, it’s time to focus on building a better board.

Because board members and the talents they possess are the tools in your tool kit, members should be recruited because they have the skills the organization needs to develop, implement, and sustain its strategic plan. Board members should not be invited simply because they have a high-profile name in the community or they are someone’s friend. An astute executive director looks three to five years down the road to forecast what the needs will be and starts building a list of prospects. For example, if an important fund-raising campaign is on the horizon, grooming and recruiting future board members with track records of fund-raising success is critical. If a major building project is in the offing, recruiting a few members with engineering backgrounds might be useful. If engaging young alumni is a priority, identifying people who fit that category is imperative.

Always strive to develop a diverse board, one that includes a balance of gender, and a wide range of ages and ethnicity. There is strength in diversity and having people with many points of view will help keep your board relevant and prevent it from devolving into a clique.

Board membership should never be a person’s first involvement with your group. Instead, identify board prospects from a list of people who attend your events, are volunteers, and who are donors. These people are your true believers. Start inviting them to additional events, ask them to serve on committees, and engage them more personally. Observe to see if they are reliable and if their interest deepens before approaching them about joining the board. Non- or minimum-level donors should not be board members. Instead, consider these people long-range prospects and begin to increase their involvement in other ways with an eye toward possibly growing them to a higher level of involvement. Having a 100% donor board is important because it gives you credibility when it’s time to ask others for contributions.

Once board prospects are identified, the executive director should meet one-on-one with each possible nominee to describe what is involved. It is important for people to understand the time and financial commitments, length of term, and what the board’s priorities will be during their tenure. Don’t extend a nomination if you hear objections about how much time the board may require, constraints on the person’s availability to attend meetings, or reluctance to support at the required donor level. Listen carefully to avoid accepting a polite “yes” from someone who is flattered to be asked, but who won’t actually fully engage. Never try to persuade someone whose initial answer is “no.”

Once new members are elected, hold an orientation to familiarize them with financial information, bylaws, strategic plans, projects in process, and things like acronyms or other organization slang. Begin to merge old and new board members by holding a planning retreat and assigning everyone to at least one working committee. Create a buddy system where continuing board members are matched with newcomers to serve as guides while the new people learn the ropes.

Make board experience meaningful by giving meaty assignments and being certain everyone is fully engaged in important projects that are consistent with their skills. Making the board experience robust and satisfying will ensure you’ve created an excellent group of ambassadors who will support your cause long after their terms expire, and who will be invaluable in helping you recruit the next batch of great board members.

 

 

Posted on

Freshen Up, Attend A Conference

The annual meeting of the North American Association of Commencement Officers (NAACO) just wrapped up. It was three days of shared ideas, access to resources, and making connections with other people who do the same work. We heard from subject matter experts, swapped ideas, told war stories, learned about best-practices, and participated in provocative, motivating sessions designed to dislodge us from our ruts and push us to rethink business as usual. For people who work in the niche world of academic ceremonies, rubbing shoulders with others who do the same and listening to authoritative presenters can be a font of useful how-to information and a confidence-building validation of our own practices. We left feeling refreshed, heads swimming with ideas and phones filled with new contact information. We also made connections with quality vendors who are themselves subject matter experts, and who offer tools that can make our jobs easier.

I believe that all employees should attend at least one annual professional meeting. Nothing grows committed, creative, motivated, and effective employees more quickly than signaling that you respect them enough to invest in their continuing education by sending them to a conference. Attending a conference is not only mentally rejuvenating, it is the most efficient and cost-effective way to update employees about the latest thinking in their specialty areas. Without this infusion of new information and ideas you and your staff are simply talking to each other in a stale echo chamber of “that’s the way we’ve always done it.” By staying home, you miss developing a network of colleagues with whom you can consult to solve problems, or whom you can call to celebrate success. Contact with professionals from other schools keeps us fresh through the cross-fertilization that can only come from listening to others who work in our field. Attending also keeps us abreast of learning about new tools and technologies that help us all do a better job for our schools. Being an active member of professional organizations has added a dimension of quality and satisfaction to my professional journey that cannot be overstated.

Here are three organizations that have been enormously helpful to me and that have served me well as vibrant, reliable resources for quality continuing professional development and have led to a network of colleagues who have become personal friends:

Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE).This international organization offers a year-round calendar of conferences, plus webinars and publications for people who work in all aspects of advancement. Of particular note is their selection of specialized summer “institutes” that provide excellent foundation training for newcomers designed to help get employees up-to-speed quickly by immersing them in higher education how-to and best practices. As careers develop, CASE has excellent programming for people at all levels and offers opportunities for meaningful volunteer and board involvement. Case.org 

North American Association of Commencement Officers (NAACO). This group is tailored for people who manage commencement and other academic ceremonies for U.S. and Canadian schools. It offers a wealth of specialized best practice information for commencement planners, provost’s staffs, registrars, and special events planners. The group hosts an annual conference and regional meetings throughout the year. Naaco.org

Protocol and Diplomacy International-Protocol Officers Association (PDI-POA). Traditionally, most PDI-POA members came from military or diplomatic backgrounds but in the past eight years, academic event planners have been the fastest growing segment of this organization’s membership. Collegiate event planners have been welcomed into the fold because we often host people and occasions that demand observance of protocol. It is necessary that we understand customs and expectations for everyone from government officials, military officers, famous authors, scientists, artists, celebrities, and international visitors and imperative that we understand their customs and expectations. Because the group’s members hail from all over the globe and include leading experts and authors on all aspects of protocol, PDI-POA is an excellent resource. PDI-POA hosts an annual forum and also offers regional workshops. Membership is particularly beneficial for people who plan president’s or chancellor’s events, who handle VIP and dignitary events, and special events planners who field a wide variety of ceremonies and occasions from every corner of campus. Protocolinternational.org.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted on

We Could All Use A Peach Corps

Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport is one of my favorite places. It is a clean, friendly model of efficiency, organization, well-curated shops, eating establishments, and services. On top of that, it’s pretty swell as a first-rate international airport. This week, it is also a model for special events planners tasked with organizing major events. It is Super Bowl week in Atlanta and the city is expecting an estimated 150,000 out-of-town visitors, many of whom will arrive by air. Predictions are between 65,000 and 75,000 more people than usual will fly the game’s official airline and Hartsfield-Jackson’s main tenant, Delta, in the days leading up to and just after the big event.

Atlanta is already the busiest airport in the world, but as I navigated my way through the conspicuously extra-crowded terminals during Super Bowl week, I was impressed because things were still working beautifully. The corridors, gate areas, and restrooms were clean, and waiting lines for everything from security to fast food were reasonable. This was thanks to months of careful planning to ensure everyone was prepared for the big week.

While the Atlanta Super Bowl Planning Committee has been meeting for more than a year, according to the January issue of Delta’s Sky magazine, the company also began months ago to plan appropriate staffing, smooth traffic flow (including ensuring competing teams’ hometown fans don’t arrive and depart from adjacent gates), ordering adequate food and beverages, arranging for additional flight attendants and pilots, and purchasing extra catering and fuel to accommodate the super-sized crowd. Plans even extend to having added supplies of pillows, blankets and toilet kits ready for the inevitable travelers who plan to await flights home by sleeping at the airport.

A key component of Delta’s success is that the company recruited employee volunteers to act as airport ambassadors. Dubbed “Peach Corps,” because Georgia is the peach state, volunteers were interviewed and selected for their expertise and commitment to customer service. They have distinctive uniforms making them easy to spot and they were readily apparent today, strategically deployed near trains and other critical junctions to direct people and answer questions. I watched as one assisted a panicked woman who had misplaced her cell phone. After calming the frantic woman, the volunteer called her number to locate the phone. It wasn’t long until the woman’s back pocket was buzzing and everyone nearby enjoyed a good laugh with the relieved customer. “Don’t tell your kids,” someone joked. The gracious sincerity of the Delta volunteer was impressive.

The takeaway for collegiate events planners is that when we are anticipating a major event on campus, no detail can be overlooked. It’s not business as usual and assuming that our regular systems, good though they may be, will not buckle under the strain is foolhardy. Creating our own Peach Corps could be just the thing to ensure that alumni, donors, prospective students, and friends enjoy a hospitable experience and take home great memories every time they enjoy major events on our campuses.