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Plan To Reduce Special Event Waste

New years in academia comes in August and one of my resolutions is to make this year’s events as eco-friendly as possible. As the planning cycle starts, now is the time to work on this. Fall begins with a series of outdoor picnics and tailgating that are by their nature, messy and wasteful, generating a mountain of one-use plastic cups, plates, cutlery, table covers, and bottles. Why? Because it’s convenient. Planning not to make so much waste requires extra effort and involves negotiating with vendors and seeking out alternatives. Wasteful packaging has become our default to the point that we’ve forgotten the ways we used to do things before the world was filled with single-serving containers, polystyrene and Styrofoam “take out” boxes and bottled water. Being environmentally aware and doing our part as events planners to stop waste is no longer just “nice,” it is imperative. The collapse of the plastic bottle recycling market and the intense media coverage this year of the billions of pounds of plastic we are stacking up on land and tossing into our oceans highlight that the effort to control event waste is essential. Here are some ways to get started:

Understand your waste and plan how to avoid it. What will you be generating? One of our first fall events is a picnic for 1,600 students. I didn’t appreciate the impact of my choice to use plastic covers on 200 tables until last year when I saw the post-event giant ball of them headed for the landfill.  This year we are using paper covers held in place with reusable tablecloth clips!

Cutting down waste begins with planning not to create it in the first place. Plan menus that don’t require plastic cutlery and put condiments like ketchup and mustard in large pump dispensers instead of single serving plastic packets. If you do have to use cutlery, choose biodegradable bamboo. Avoid the ubiquitous plastic bagged napkin, knife, fork, spoon, salt and pepper. Often, only one of these items is used and the entire packet gets tossed in the trash. Cheap and readily available, I’ve seen caterers discard cases of these rather than load them for a return to their headquarters. You’ll no doubt get push-back from your food service provider or caterer, but strive for ways to offer unwrapped cutlery so people can choose only what they need.  Ban beverages in plastic bottles completely. Instead, offer drinks in aluminum cans or in paper cups filled from dispensers. Encourage people to bring their own bottles that can be filled at water stations but don’t make your own event-specific water bottles.  Everyone already has cupboards full of reusable bottles and making new ones is just generating more plastic! There is a strong market for aluminum recycling so canned beverages are an eco-friendly option. Water (and even wine) is now available in cans. Canned water comes in still, carbonated, and mineral options and with a little advanced planning, it’s possible to get it branded with your school logo.

Require vendors (including on campus food service) to honor your commitment to recyclables. Until everyone gets used to the idea, you’ll have to reinforce your commitment over and over again. Changes will need to be incorporated into the supply ordering process so start early.

Avoid the following because they cannot be recycled: Items that come in wrappers such as candy, condiments, and chips (serve chips in baskets with tongs); polystyrene/Styrofoam plates, cups, bowls, clam shell containers,  and “to go boxes;” plastic cutlery, bags, straws, stir sticks, and lids. Food-soiled boxes (like pizza boxes) and used plates.

Know what is accepted by your local recycler.  Find out what your campus recycling capabilities are and determine how to use them effectively. You may have to contract with an outside vendor.

Make it easy with good collection containers and clear signs. Put clean, nice-looking containers in high-traffic, high-visibility, convenient locations. Avoid dirty containers and those with lids because people don’t want to touch them. Clearly list the items that go in each container so people don’t have to try to figure it out.  Instead of saying “#1 plastic,” make it simple with “plastic bottles, aluminum cans, paper,” “food, used plates, and cutlery.” Since you’ve already selected products that can be recycled, there is no need to confuse people with too much information. Signs should be at eye-level. Always put a trash can beside a recycle bin to help people separate recyclables from trash in one stop.

Create a “Green Team.” Organize volunteers to tend recycling containers, answer questions, and empty as needed. This helps prevent people from dumping everything in the trash.

Make indoor functions green, too. Use china instead of disposable cups and plates, linen instead of throw-away table covers. Skip plastic straws and stir sticks. If you must offer straws, search “paper straws” online and you will find many vendors. You can even get the straws logoed. Don’t use plastic encased name badges or the now conference-standard name badges in giant plastic holders that dangle from lanyards. Most of these short-lived items wind up in the landfill and no one uses those “souvenir” lanyards after your event, meeting, or conference is done. (We’ve returned to logoed, paper stick-on badges with no complaints.) Don’t print programs, tickets, brochures, maps, agendas and the like. Instead, provide free Wi-Fi and either create a meeting app for this information, or post it on your web site. Skip purchasing ad specialty items that wind up in people’s junk drawers and eventually in the landfill. Forget ordering Polypropylene tote bags that are often given to attendees (with good intentions) to be reusable as grocery bags. A thermoplastic, about 5 billion pounds of Polypropylene are produced in the U.S. annually, yet less than 1 percent is recycled. The rest winds up in landfills where it takes 20-30 years to decompose.

Make your efforts known. Publicize the fact that you are striving to reduce waste and enlist people to help in the cause. Use the power of your higher-ed pulpit to teach students about environmental awareness and recycling by modeling these practices on campus. It’s an easy and important way to instill these habits in the next generation.