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Show Appreciation, Write A Thank You Note

 

Saying thanks and showing appreciation to our colleagues is one of the most powerful motivators in the work place. It’s also one of the most under used. I like to say “thank you” throughout the school year because it makes me feel good and it helps keep spirits up as we march through one event after another. If you haven’t been doing so, there is an old saying that it is never too late to say thanks. The academic year-end is a perfect time to express your gratitude.

While there are many sources suggesting ways to thank employees or colleagues ranging from snacks to gift cards, I find one of the most effective is to give the rarest of items–a hand-written thank you note. A personal note is just that–it communicates to the recipient that you noticed and appreciated his or her contributions and because it is in your own handwriting, it conveys your message in a way no emoji-sprinkled text, commercially produced thank you card or box of bagels left at the office coffee maker can ever rival.

A recent study on employee engagement cited by the Huffington Post (http://Huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/19/appreciation) found that 80 percent of employees are motivated to work harder and remain more loyal when the boss shows appreciation for their work. But you don’t have to be the boss to send a thank-you note. No event planner can be successful without the hard work of others and recognizing them is not only appreciated, it can pay major dividends going forward.

I send a blizzard of thank you notes following events to everyone from the featured speaker to the cleaning staff (remember your administrative assistant, too). Occasionally, I even send a note to the president’s spouse expressing thanks for her graciousness after we have invaded her home, the university’s official residence, with gear, caterers, and hundreds of guests.  I also send thanks to the university police department for their help with  security, parking, and crowd control.

I address each person personally and mention specifics of what they did to help make our efforts a success. Over the years this habit has helped engender willing cooperation when I ask people to go above and beyond their everyday tasks. Recently, a theater professor who often teams up with our events staff told me that when he moved offices he found a trove of old thank you notes I had sent. I was very touched that he had saved them.

We all crave thanks and recognition, yet it is a scarce commodity in the work place. People who say thank you stand out. I once worked for a president who thanked his staff with notes, flowers, or small gifts when a job was particularly well-done. In the back of our minds, all of us were working to earn one of those special recognitions every time we undertook a new project. Showing appreciation conveys respect and builds loyalty and trust because it affirms that someone noticed and valued our efforts.

Writing thank you notes is not a long, complicated, or odious task. Simply make a list of people and take pen in hand. Use a fold-over note card, either one produced by your school or company or purchase your own from a stationary store. (Crane and Co. (http://www.crane.com) is my favorite. An American paper manufacturer since 1770, the company produces fine 100% cotton papers that are classic in styling and noted for understated elegance.)

Open the card and writing only on the bottom half, address the person, mention the occasion and something specific about his or her contribution. If possible, use the person’s name again in the body of your message and then say “thank you.” You’re done! Mail as soon as possible after the occasion. You will make someone’s day and you will feel good, too.